The Network of International Student Mobility

Start of the project: 01-Jun-2018 - End of the project: 31-Dec-2018

Promoting transnational student mobility is high on national and European educational agendas. Many previous studies on this topic focus on what attracts international students to a certain country, investigating this question mainly from the point of view of the receiving country or higher education system. Most of the research on longer-term student mobility (so-called "degree mobility") is limited to the Anglo-Saxon geographical area and focuses on economic motives for student mobility.

This project is concerned firstly with international mobility of students from and into those countries from which (relative to the size of the domestic higher education sector) more national students go abroad for an entire study cycle (known as exporters). Secondly, it looks at student mobility into and from countries that (relative to the size of the domestic higher education sector) accept more international students than the number of national students they transfer to other countries (known as importers). In addition to the extension of the geographical focus, an extension of the analytical point of view also takes place compared to studies which mainly use economic factors to explain the phenomena. It considers similarities and differences of political systems as well as cultural and religious similarities between the country chosen for the stay abroad and the country of origin.

In order to depict these complex relational patterns between pairs of countries (known as dyads), the characteristics of both countries belonging to the pair, i.e. the host country and the home country of the students are considered. Through these geographical and analytical extensions, a sample is generated which also presents an increased variance on central explanatory factors such as the index of democracy and cultural variables such as language and religious affiliation.

Methodologically, a network analysis is used. Descriptive network analysis is used to illustrate the exchange relationships and the extent of the exchange relationships between countries. In addition, quantitative analyses (Exponential Random Graph Models) are used to identify determinants of the direction and intensity of exchanges between countries.

This project is integrated in the DZHW research cluster "Mobility of the Highly Skilled".

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Publications

Networks of International Student Mobility: Enlargement and Consolidation of the European Transnational Education Space?

Vögtle, E.M. & Windzio, M. (2016).
Networks of International Student Mobility: Enlargement and Consolidation of the European Transnational Education Space? Higher Education, 1-19.
Abstract

In this paper, we investigate the impact of membership in the Bologna Process on patterns and driving forces of cross-national student mobility. Student exchange flows are analyzed for almost all Bologna Process member states and non-Bologna OECD members over a ten-year period (from 2000 to 2010). Based on social network analyses, we first visualize the exchange patterns between sampled countries. In doing so, we analyze the student exchange linkages to gain descriptive insights into the development of the network. Second, we use exponential random graph models (ERGM) to test which factors determine transnational student mobility.

Higher Education Policy Convergence and the Bologna Process. A cross-national study.

Vögtle, E. (2014).
Higher Education Policy Convergence and the Bologna Process. A cross-national study. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Sweeping Change - But Does It Matter? The BP and Determinants of Student Mobility.

Fulge, T., & Vögtle, E. (2014).
Sweeping Change - But Does It Matter? The BP and Determinants of Student Mobility. In Martens, K., Knodel, P., & Windzio, M. (Hrsg.) A New Constellation of Statehood in Education Policy?. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan: 67-88.

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Presentations

The Network of international student mobility.

Vögtle, E. M. (2018, Juni/Juli).
The Network of international student mobility. Presentation held during the Session Preferential attachment at the XXXVIII Sunbelt, Utrecht, The Netherlands .
Abstract

Preferential attachment or hegemony, from a political science standpoint/perspective, means an indirect form of government in which the hegemon dominates geopolitically subordinated states by implicit means instead of direct military force. From social network perspective, a hegemon can be identified from the “common” states by its position in a cooperative network. In terms of Preferential attachment it is more likely that international students connect to a more central node (hence country) rather than to a marginal one. Thus already existing exchange relationships enforce future ones.

Lead Researcher

Eva Maria Vögtle
Dr. Eva Maria Vögtle Lead Researcher +49 511 450670-157

External Contact

Prof. Dr. Michael Windzio, Universität Bremen

Press contact

Daniel Matthes
Daniel Matthes +49 511 450670-532
To press section